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By RazPhoto

In the clear blue sky and broken clouds, spot a black dot across the tree.

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When zoomed in, a plane can be seen jetting away.

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During sunset the moon is shining through the clear blue sky, above the naked trees.

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The naked tree with branches and twigs, birds make a nest for comfort and warmth.

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On a beautiful evening the bus is approaching on a not so busy road.

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Gatwick and Heathrow to buy Anti-drone equipement

Following the disturbance at Sussex airport prior to christmas, Gatwick and Heathrow will pay millions of pounds on anti-drone technology.

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Last month at Gatwick the RAF placed equipment on a roof, that identifies and blocks communications between a drone and its operator.

Due to drone sightings in December, over 1,000 flights were cancelled in a span of 3 days.

Gatwick spent a total of £5 million to prohibit later assaults, whilst Heathrow confirmed to also purchase the systems.

Between 19th and 21st December, more than 140,000 traveller’s were disturbed during the 36 hour havoc.

The government brought in the military and was only stood down on Wednesday 2nd January.

The personnel of Royal Air Force Regiment were associated in the deployment, said the Ministry of Defence (MoD).

It was reported last year, that MoD requested the Drone Dome system, which is manufactured by Rafeal an Israeli company.

The system has a scope of several miles and consumes four radars to provide 360-degrees detection to recognise and trail drones.

It is assumed MoD is yet waiting to obtain the system, because Gatwick used substituted technology.

It is stated that Gatwick and Heathrow have not revealed the equipment they intend to operate in future.

After the disturbance Gatwick invested in new anti-drone defences, confirmed a spokeswoman.

At Heathrow, a spokesman stated:

“The safety of our passengers and colleagues remains our top priority.

Working closely with relevant authorities including the Met Police, we are constantly looking at the best technologies that help remove the threat of drones.” (BBC News)

Investigation of the disturbance is still ongoing by Sussex Police, and stated it occurred by “many occasions of illegal drone activity”.

The force stated it had “appropriate viewing” from 115 witnesses – 93 of them explained as “believable” – including police officers, a pilot and airport staff.

According to Civil Aviation Authority, rules for flying recreational drones in the UK are:

  1. Drone must be in line of sight at all times
  2. Not within 50m of people, vehicles or buildings
  3. No higher than 120m (400ft)

Source:

https://www.bbc.co.uk

Pictures are only for illustration purposes.